This document is a guide for writing Bibliographies and In-Text Citations. MLA (Modern Language Association) style is the referencing style suggested for use by the HCT.

Bibliographies and In-Text Citations help avoid plagiarism. Plagiarism is stealing a person’s words, ideas or images by not naming the original author. Penalties for plagiarism at the Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT) are severe often resulting in dismissal. See the Student Handbook for more information on plagiarism and penalties for plagiarism.

The first section of the MLA site is the Quick Reference Guide. It is most useful for Diploma and Foundations students. The information on Bibliographies and In-Text Citations are most useful for Higher Diploma and Bachelor students.

For more information please check the HCT Online Library. It has a very comprehensive section on external web sites that have information on referencing.

In addition, the HCT subscribes to a bibliography tool called Noodlebib. Students - please use "MLA Advanced" in Noodlebib. See more details and other online tools in the MLA Tools & Resources page within this site.

Works Cited List

When do you write a Works Cited list?
  • Every time you write a research report.
What is a Works Cited list?
  • It is a list of every source of information that you make a reference to in your report.
  • It includes books, articles, television programs, Internet sites, interviews and all other information sources you use in your report.
  • It is an alphabetical list by the author’s last name.
  • It is attached at the end of a report.
Why write a Works Cited list?
  • To show what information sources you use to write your report.
  • To help the reader find more information.
  • To prevent being charged with plagiarism which is stealing another person's ideas (without giving credit).
How do you write a Works Cited list?
  • Follow the rules set by The Modern Language Association or MLA style.
  • Look at the examples on the following pages. Each format (ie. books, newspapers, web sites, etc) has an example. Follow these examples if you are writing your own bibliography.
  • Use NoodleBib.
    NoodleBib will help format your bibliography and keep it online until you need to save and print it. You should use the MLA Advanced option.

Bibliographies

When do you write a bibliography?
  • Every time you write a research report.
What is a bibliography?
  • It is a list of every source of information you use to research and write your report.
  • It includes books, articles, television programs, Internet sites, interviews or any other information sources.
  • It is an alphabetical list by the author’s surname.
  • It is attached at the end of a report.
Why write a bibliography?
  • To show what you have used for your research.
  • To help the reader find more information.
  • To prevent being charged with plagiarism which is using another person's ideas without giving credit.
How do you write a bibliography?
  • Follow the rules set by The Modern Language Association or MLA style.
  • Look at the examples on the following pages. Each format (ie. books, newspapers, web sites, etc) has an example. Follow these examples if you are writing your own bibliography.
  • Use NoodleBib.
    NoodleBib will help format your bibliography and keep it online until you need to save and print it. You should use the MLA Advanced option.

In-text Citation

What is in-text citation?
  • A link in the body of your assignment to your bibliography.
  • Offers enough information so that the reader can find the complete information in the bibliography.
  • Written next to the information that has been taken from another source.
  • May be written within a sentence or at the end of a sentence.
When do you use in-text citation?
  • Whenever you use information from another source in your report.
Why do you use in-text citation?
  • To lead your reader to the correct entry in your Bibliography.
  • To avoid plagiarizing.

Sources for Information on the MLA Style

1. Purdue Online Writing Lab
2. Coyle, William, and Joe Law. Research Papers. 13th ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2005.

[Library: LB2369 .C65 2005]
3. Hacker, Diana. A Writer’s Reference. 6th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2007.

[Book + CD] [Library: Reference PE1408 .H2778 2007]
4. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009.